Primary Testicular NK/T-cell Lymphoma presented as testicular abscess: A Case Report and Literature Review of 33 cases

Publish : March 15, 2013
Total Download : 2

Sanya Sukpanichnant • Yingyong Chinthammitr • Naravat Poungvarin
Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand
Corresponding author: Sanya Sukpanichnant, M.D.,
Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand,
Tel/Fax +66 2 411 4260 e-mail: sanya.suk@mahidol.ac.th
Coauthors and names of the department and institution:
Yingyong Chinthammitr, M.D.
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand
Naravat Poungvarin, M.D., Ph.D.
Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand

Abstract


Primary testicular NK/T-cell lymphoma is rare. We report a 61-year-old Thai man who presented with right testicular abscess clinically but tissue obtained from incision and drainage was proven to be NK/T-cell lymphoma. The lymphoma cells were small to medium in size and showed angiocentricity with associated necrosis. The lymphoma cells were CD3+ (cytoplasmic), CD43+, CD56+, TIA-1+, Ki-67+ (nearly 100%) and
EBV encoded RNA (EBER)+. Clinical staging was IE. CHOP chemotherapy and intrathecal methotrexate for primary CNS prophylaxis were administered with partial reduction of the testicular mass. However, 5.5 months after diagnosis, the patient developed left testicular enlargement and left facial palsy caused by leptomeningeal involvement. The patient died of progressive disease 9 months after diagnosis. The clinical course in
this patient was aggressive, similar to those described in the literature review except for the uncommon CNS involvement. Based on 19 cases of primary testicular lymphoma (including the present case) and 15 cases of testicular involvement by NK/T-cell lymphoma elsewhere, the former seem to be less aggressive than the latter
but the difference is not statistically significant in either overall median survival (32 vs. 16 weeks, p = 0.086) or mean survival (29.4 vs. 17.9 weeks, p = 0.083).

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Address of editorial Corresponce
✎  Vorachai Sirikulchayanonta, MD, Editor-in-Chief: Asian Archives of Pathology, Faculty of Science, Rangsit University, Pathumthani 12000, Thailand.
✉  Email address: asianarchpath@gmail.com, vorachai7@gmail.com